With a history spanning over 140 years, Ericsson has proven itself to be a resilient partner for telecom operators looking to monetize into new revenue streams. Speaking to Telecom Review, Rafiah Ibrahim, President of Ericsson Middle East and Africa, said the company's experience and understanding of using automation and processes makes it the ideal partner for telecom operators willing to embrace change.

Read more: Ericsson: Helping operators monetize into new revenue streams

Sofrecom, an Orange Group subsidiary, is a consulting and engineering company in the telecommunications sector. Telecom Review spoke to Sofrecom CEO Guillaume Boudin and managing director of Sofrecom Middle East, Elias Saab, about the company's role in reshaping telecom operators' business models to keep up with industry disruption. 

Read more: Sofrecom: Reshaping operators’ business models

Smart Dubai, an initiative anchored in the vision of His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai, aims to make Dubai the happiest and smartest city on earth. The organization's visionary leader, Her Excellency Dr. Aisha Bin Bishr, Director General, spoke to Telecom Review about the importance of embracing digital practices and data sharing.

Read more: Smart Dubai’s vision of a digital and interconnected city

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Telecom network equipment giant Nokia recently completed discussions for laying off employees in its home country of Finland. As a result of the talks, Nokia will cut 170 jobs, the company stated on June 9.

The job cutting discussions were first announced in May, when the company said it was preparing to fire up to 200 employees from network operations and support functions, Reuters reports. The majority of job cuts (70 percent) will be from Nokia's Espoo headquarters and will be completed by the end of 2017.

Nokia has around 6,100 employees in its home country and around 101,000 globally. The vendor is providing aid to staff affected by the layoffs, such as referring them to other available positions which arise through the remainder of the year, and also retraining staff to find alternative positions within the company.

Last year Nokia laid off 960 employees in Finland and also said it would fire up to 1,400 positions in Germany. The staff reductions are part of a 1.2 billion euro ($1.3 billion) worldwide cost-savings plan which Nokia announced after its 2016 acquisition of Alcatel-Lucent. The company said at the time that it expected to benefit from cost savings of 1.2 billion euros in the form of synergies during 2018.