Riverbed, an American IT company that develops products to improve application performance across wide area networks (WANs), recently commissioned a study surveying 1,000 IT decision makers globally to explore the impact legacy and next-generation networks have on cloud adoption and digital transformation. Telecom Review discussed the findings with Charbel Khniesser, Riverbed's Regional Presales Director for Middle East, Turkey and North Africa.

Read more: Riverbed: SD-WAN essential for building next-generation networks

UAE telecom provider “du” (EITC) has over ten years’ experience dealing with multiple partners from various industries. Bundling everything together that those partners bring to the table means du can give its customers the best value for money and significantly improve processes, said du’s chief commercial officer, Fahad Al Hassawi, speaking to Telecom Review.

Read more: Partnerships benefit customers, says du CCO

Saudi Arabia is going through rapid transformation, according to Deemah AlYahya, CEO of Saudi Arabia’s National Digitization Unit (NDU), a government arm mandated to accelerate efforts to achieve Saudi Vision 2030 objectives, an initiative to diversify the kingdom’s economy away from oil dependence. This transformation, Ms. AlYahya said, will require collaboration, open data sharing and injecting innovation into citizens.

Read more: Saudi NDU CEO: 'We want to inject innovation into citizens'

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Telecom network equipment giant Nokia recently completed discussions for laying off employees in its home country of Finland. As a result of the talks, Nokia will cut 170 jobs, the company stated on June 9.

The job cutting discussions were first announced in May, when the company said it was preparing to fire up to 200 employees from network operations and support functions, Reuters reports. The majority of job cuts (70 percent) will be from Nokia's Espoo headquarters and will be completed by the end of 2017.

Nokia has around 6,100 employees in its home country and around 101,000 globally. The vendor is providing aid to staff affected by the layoffs, such as referring them to other available positions which arise through the remainder of the year, and also retraining staff to find alternative positions within the company.

Last year Nokia laid off 960 employees in Finland and also said it would fire up to 1,400 positions in Germany. The staff reductions are part of a 1.2 billion euro ($1.3 billion) worldwide cost-savings plan which Nokia announced after its 2016 acquisition of Alcatel-Lucent. The company said at the time that it expected to benefit from cost savings of 1.2 billion euros in the form of synergies during 2018.