Riverbed, an American IT company that develops products to improve application performance across wide area networks (WANs), recently commissioned a study surveying 1,000 IT decision makers globally to explore the impact legacy and next-generation networks have on cloud adoption and digital transformation. Telecom Review discussed the findings with Charbel Khniesser, Riverbed's Regional Presales Director for Middle East, Turkey and North Africa.

Read more: Riverbed: SD-WAN essential for building next-generation networks

UAE telecom provider “du” (EITC) has over ten years’ experience dealing with multiple partners from various industries. Bundling everything together that those partners bring to the table means du can give its customers the best value for money and significantly improve processes, said du’s chief commercial officer, Fahad Al Hassawi, speaking to Telecom Review.

Read more: Partnerships benefit customers, says du CCO

Saudi Arabia is going through rapid transformation, according to Deemah AlYahya, CEO of Saudi Arabia’s National Digitization Unit (NDU), a government arm mandated to accelerate efforts to achieve Saudi Vision 2030 objectives, an initiative to diversify the kingdom’s economy away from oil dependence. This transformation, Ms. AlYahya said, will require collaboration, open data sharing and injecting innovation into citizens.

Read more: Saudi NDU CEO: 'We want to inject innovation into citizens'

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Nokia innovation and testing has underlined the flexibility, upgradeability and scalability of its AirScale radio portfolio to adapt to the frequency bands that will deliver the promise of 5G in initial applications of the technology. By proving the ability of AirScale to support both low and high bands, operators will be able to provide wide area coverage and indoor coverage from the first day of 5G operations without the need for complicated network reconfigurations.

5G promises a significant change in connectivity, delivering lower latency, enhanced spectral efficiency and greater energy efficiency both for networks and devices. The range of applications enabled by 5G - from multiple access needs in a sports stadium and improving connectivity in dense urban environments, to enabling 'Industry 4.0' applications and fixed wireless access  - will require high-band frequencies (millimeter wave and centimeter wave) as well as the evolution of existing low-band frequencies.

At this week's 5G World Summit in London, Nokia will showcase how AirScale - a key component of its 5G FIRST solution - can leverage Nokia Flexi RF units already deployed by operators, ensuring that their existing investment in radio technology is protected, while preparing them for the path to 5G. Nokia will outline the use of different spectrum bands - from sub-1GHz to millimeter waves - to meet expectations for depth of coverage as well as higher capacity and data rates promised by 5G.

5G applications, such as connecting IoT devices as well as penetration of indoor environments as well as coverage over large areas, require low-band frequencies. The ability to utilize these bands has recently been verified in tests at Nokia's 5G labs in Finland, and included the 700 MHz, 800 MHz and 850 MHz frequencies.

Harold Graham, head of Nokia's 5G Business Line, said: "Enabling operators to leverage their existing assets allows them to accelerate the rollout of 5G into lower frequency bands as cost effectively as possible. This approach gives them the ability to address new revenue opportunities across multiple industries."